Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters

Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters

(MA) Jeremy Renner, Gemma Arterton, Famke Janssen, Pihla Viitala, Thomas Mann, Peter Stormare

If there’s something strange in your neighbourhood, who you gonna call? Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters.

That’s right, the little boy and girl who got lost in the woods and found themselves in a witch’s cottage made of candy are all grown up and, armed with an arsenal of medieval machine guns and crossbows, they travel the countryside ridding towns of their witches.

The Brothers Grimm tale is the latest in a growing number of traditional fairy tales to get Hollywood revisions in recent years.

In 2011 we had Red Riding Hood, last year we had a double dose of Snow White with Mirror Mirror and Snow White and the Huntsman, and Jack the Giant Slayer is due to hit our screens in March.

Actually, Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters was shot two years ago and Paramount has been waiting for the right moment to let it out. This provides some answers for those people wondering what on earth Jeremy Renner was doing in this after appearing in genuine blockbusters like The AvengersMission Impossible: Ghost Protocol and The Bourne Legacy.

Instead, the movie seems to take itself a bit too seriously; surprising given that Will Ferrel and Adam McKay of Anchorman fame are among its producers.

The first time I saw a poster for this movie I shook my head. When I saw the trailer it just made me a bit sad. Surely this had to be one of the most ridiculous premises for a movie yet, I thought.

But then I saw it and guess what, it is ridiculous … but it isn’t terrible.

Where it drops the ball is that it doesn’t seem to realise that it is ridiculous. Ridiculousness in itself is not a bad thing. Had the filmmakers embraced the ridiculousness of the notion that Hansel and Gretel might grow up to be arse-kicking supernatural bounty hunters they could have played it up a bit, earned a bit of camp appeal and maybe even gathered a cult following.

Instead, the movie seems to take itself a bit too seriously; surprising given that Will Ferrel and Adam McKay of Anchorman fame are among its producers.

While most of the movie is pretty inane, there are moments of cleverness. For example, not only did their childhood experience set them on the path to their present day profession, it also has also left Hansel a diabetic, suffering from “the sugar sickness” and requiring regular insulin injections.

In a movie that is so predictable that you feel like you know what is around every corner, the one thing that is surprising about Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters is how schlocky it is.

While the premise seems to suggest a very light gothic horror, the movie has a lot of blood, a surprising amount of coarse language and even a little bit of nudity.

As a result it has been given an MA15+ rating, which will surely only serve to restrict the access of the primary demographic, who might have been persuaded to think Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters sounded like a good idea.

Duncan Mclean

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